Monday, October 20, 2014

EuroBSDCon Trip Report: Bjoern Heidotting

The FreeBSD Foundation was a gold sponsor of EuroBSDCon 2014, which was held in Sofia, Bulgaria in September. The Foundation also sponsored Bjoern Heidotting to attend the conference, who provides the following trip report:

Since I'm fairly new to the FreeBSD community I would like to introduce myself first. My name is Bjoern Heidotting, I live in Germany, I work as a system administrator and I'm a FreeBSD user since 2006 and a contributor since 2012. I mostly contribute patches for the German documentation in the doc-tree. Why do I contribute? Well, the short version is that I simply wanted to give something back to FreeBSD and the community.

Thanks to Benedict Reuschling, who invited me, and the FreeBSD Foundation, I was able to attend the DevSummit and the conference at EuroBSDCon 2014 in Sofia.

I arrived at Sofia airport on Wednesday and I took a taxi to get to my hotel the Best Western Expo, directly located at the IEC where the conference was held. However, the taxidriver decided to take me on a sightseeing tour through the city of Sofia. But after 1,5 hours I finally arrived at the hotel. The actual time to get from the airport to my hotel is about 10 minutes. Fortunately taxis are cheap in Bulgaria compared to Germany. And the city is really, really worth seeing.

Later that day, I met Daniel Peyrolon, a GSoC student with whom I shared a room. We decided to take dinner together and started getting to know each other. Afterwards, we socialized with some other FreeBSD people at the hotel bar.

On Thursday the DevSummit started with every attendee and developer introducing himself. Then some interesting topics and roadmaps were discussed for the upcoming 11.0 release, as well as other topics such as ASLR, UEFI, 10G Ethernet, just to name a few. It was a very interesting brainstorming with valuable input from all attendees. Since it was my first time at a DevSummit, I was impressed to see how fast these people can fill a bunch of foils with topics and ideas. Awesome!

After lunch a small group, including me, sat together in another room where I started to work on several patches for the Handbook. In the evening we had dinner at Lebed Restaurant. A very nice location. This is where I first met Deb Goodkin from the Foundation. She was the one I talked to prior to the conference and she brought Daniel and me together. Thank you Deb. It was very nice meeting her.

On Friday I mostly worked on a big patch for the network-servers section in the Handbook. I also met Beat Gaetzi while catching fresh air outside and we talked about our roles in the Project and what we do. After lunch the documentation topic started, which I was very interested in. We talked about issues on the website, Handbook sections, etc. The details of the session can be found on the wiki.

In the evening we had dinner at "The Windmill" and I met Henning Brauer from the OpenBSD project. It was really fun talking to him. Man, this guy can tell crazy stories.

Saturday and Sunday were conference days with one interesting talk chasing the next. All the talks were great, altough I had some favorites, including "Snapshots, Replication, and Boot-Environments" by Kris Moore, "Introducing ASLR in FreeBSD" by Shawn Webb, and "Securing sensitive & restricted data" by Dag-Erling Smorgrav. One of the highlights for me was the social event in Hotel Balkan on Saturday. Again, meeting the people behind the email addresses and talking to them was a great experience.

A big thanks goes out to Shteryana Shopova and her crew for organizing this great event.

Monday, October 13, 2014

FreeBSD 10.1-RC2 Now Available

The second RC build of the 10.1-RELEASE release cycle is now available on the FTP servers for the amd64, armv6, i386, ia64, powerpc, powerpc64 and sparc64 architectures.

The image checksums follow are included in the original announcement email.

Installer images and memory stick images are available here.

If you notice problems you can report them through the Bugzilla PR system or on the -stable mailing list.

If you would like to use SVN to do a source based update of an existing system, use the "releng/10.1" branch.

A list of changes since 10.0-RELEASE are available here.

Changes between 10.1-RC1 and 10.1-RC2 include:

  • Fix XHCI driver for devices which have more than 15 physical root HUB ports.
  • Fix old iSCSI initiator to work with new CAM locking.
  • Fix page length reported for Block Limits VPD page.
  • Add QCOW v1 & v2 support to mkimg(1).
Pre-installed virtual machine images for 10.1-RC2 are also available for amd64 and i386 architectures.  The images are located here.

The disk images are available in QCOW2, VHD, VMDK, and raw disk image formats.  The image download size is approximately 135 MB, which decompress to a 20GB sparse image.

The partition layout is:
  • 512k - freebsd-boot GPT partition type (bootfs GPT label)
  • 1GB  - freebsd-swap GPT partition type (swapfs GPT label)
  • ~17GB - freebsd-ufs GPT partition type (rootfs GPT label)
To install packages from the dvd1.iso installer, create and mount the /dist directory:

# mkdir -p /dist
# mount -t cd9660 /dev/cd0 /dist

Next, install pkg(8) from the DVD:
 

# env REPOS_DIR=/dist/packages/repos pkg bootstrap

At this point, pkg-add(8) can be used to install additional packages from the DVD.  Please note, the REPOS_DIR environment variable should be used each time using the DVD as the package repository, otherwise conflicts with packages from the upstream mirrors may occur when they are fetched.  For example, to install Gnome and Xorg, run:
 

# env REPOS_DIR=/dist/packages/repos pkg install \
  xorg-server xorg gnome2 [...]

The freebsd-update(8) utility supports binary upgrades of amd64 and i386 systems running earlier FreeBSD releases.  Systems running earlier
FreeBSD releases can upgrade as follows:

# freebsd-update upgrade -r 10.1-RC2

During this process, freebsd-update(8) may ask the user to help by merging some configuration files or by confirming that the automatically
performed merging was done correctly.

# freebsd-update install

The system must be rebooted with the newly installed kernel before continuing.


# shutdown -r now

After rebooting, freebsd-update needs to be run again to install the new userland components:


# freebsd-update install
It is recommended to rebuild and install all applications if possible, especially if upgrading from an earlier FreeBSD release, for example,
FreeBSD 8.x.  Alternatively, the user can install misc/compat9x and other compatibility libraries, afterwards the system must be rebooted
into the new userland:

# shutdown -r now

Finally, after rebooting, freebsd-update needs to be run again to remove stale files:

# freebsd-update install

Love FreeBSD?  Support this and future releases with a donation to the FreeBSD Foundation!

Saturday, October 4, 2014

FreeBSD 10.1-RC1 Now Available

The first RC build of the 10.1-RELEASE release cycle is now available on the FTP servers for the amd64, armv6, i386, ia64, powerpc, powerpc64 and sparc64 architectures.

The image checksums follow are included in the original announcement email.

Installer images and memory stick images are available here.

If you notice problems you can report them through the Bugzilla PR system or on the -stable mailing list.

If you would like to use SVN to do a source based update of an existing system, use the "releng/10.1" branch.

A list of changes since 10.0-RELEASE are available here.

Changes between 10.1-BETA3 and 10.1-RC1 include:

  • A bug that would cause all processes to appear to have the parent PID of '1' has been fixed.
  • Various updates to bsdinstall(8) and bsdconfig(8).
  • The Hyper-V KVP (key-value pair) driver has been added, and enabled by default on amd64 and i386 architectures.
Pre-installed virtual machine images for 10.1-RC1 are also available for amd64 and i386 architectures.  The images are located here.

The disk images are available in QCOW2, VHD, VMDK, and raw disk image formats.  The image download size is approximately 135 MB, which decompress to a 20GB sparse image.

The partition layout is:
  • 512k - freebsd-boot GPT partition type (bootfs GPT label)
  • 1GB  - freebsd-swap GPT partition type (swapfs GPT label)
  • ~17GB - freebsd-ufs GPT partition type (rootfs GPT label)
To install packages from the dvd1.iso installer, create and mount the /dist directory:

# mkdir -p /dist
# mount -t cd9660 /dev/cd0 /dist

Next, install pkg(8) from the DVD:
 

# env REPOS_DIR=/dist/packages/repos pkg bootstrap

At this point, pkg-add(8) can be used to install additional packages from the DVD.  Please note, the REPOS_DIR environment variable should be used each time using the DVD as the package repository, otherwise conflicts with packages from the upstream mirrors may occur when they are fetched.  For example, to install Gnome and Xorg, run:
 

# env REPOS_DIR=/dist/packages/repos pkg install \
  xorg-server xorg gnome2 [...]

The freebsd-update(8) utility supports binary upgrades of amd64 and i386 systems running earlier FreeBSD releases.  Systems running earlier
FreeBSD releases can upgrade as follows:

# freebsd-update upgrade -r 10.1-BETA3

During this process, freebsd-update(8) may ask the user to help by merging some configuration files or by confirming that the automatically
performed merging was done correctly.

# freebsd-update install

The system must be rebooted with the newly installed kernel before continuing.


# shutdown -r now

After rebooting, freebsd-update needs to be run again to install the new userland components:


# freebsd-update install
It is recommended to rebuild and install all applications if possible, especially if upgrading from an earlier FreeBSD release, for example,
FreeBSD 8.x.  Alternatively, the user can install misc/compat9x and other compatibility libraries, afterwards the system must be rebooted
into the new userland:

# shutdown -r now

Finally, after rebooting, freebsd-update needs to be run again to remove stale files:

# freebsd-update install

Love FreeBSD?  Support this and future releases with a donation to the FreeBSD Foundation!

Friday, October 3, 2014

Foundation at Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing

The FreeBSD Foundation is excited to be participating in the Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing conference to be held in Phoenix, AZ on October 8-10. As many of you know, Rear Admiral Grace Hopper was a pioneer in computing, inventor of the first compiler, and the first person to record a (literal) bug. This year's annual conference in her honor has a full registration of 8,000 women computing technologists from all over the world.

The Foundation is a Silver non-profit sponsor for this event and will have a booth in the Expo area. In addition to informational brochures and Foundation pens, we'll be giving away some stickers created for this event. The stickers say "I choose FreeBSD because I know my ability to create the future has nothing to do with my gender and everything to do with my skills".

As part of this year's Grace Hopper Open Source Day on October 8, Dru Lavigne will be presenting "An Introduction to FreeBSD" at 14:00 in rooms South 164-166.

Shteryana Shopova will be hosting a lunchtime table topic on FreeBSD at table #12 on October 9 from 12:45 to 15:30.

Registration has closed for this event as it has reached its maximum capacity. However, if you know a woman technologist who is attending, let her know about the FreeBSD booth, presentation, and lunchtime table topic.

Wednesday, October 1, 2014

FreeBSD Foundation and Cavium Inc. Collaborate on FreeBSD ARMv8 Based Implementation

The FreeBSD Foundation is pleased to announce a collaboration with Cavium Inc. to  develop and deliver the first ARMv8 reference design and implementation of the FreeBSD Operating System based on the ThunderX™ workload optimized processor family.  Find out more at here.

Sunday, September 28, 2014

FreeBSD 10.1-BETA3 Now Available

The third BETA build of the 10.1-RELEASE release cycle is now available on the FTP servers for the amd64, armv6, i386, ia64, powerpc, powerpc64 and sparc64 architectures.

This is expected to be the final BETA release of the 10.1-RELEASE cycle.

The image checksums follow are included in the original announcement email.

Installer images and memory stick images are available here.

If you notice problems you can report them through the Bugzilla PR system or on the -stable mailing list.

If you would like to use SVN to do a source based update of an existing system, use the "stable/10" branch.

A list of changes since 10.0-RELEASE are available on the stable/10 release notes page.

Changes between 10.1-BETA2 and 10.1-BETA3 include:

  • Support for serial and null console has been added to the UEFI boot loader.
  • A potential panic triggered by referencing a device that has been renamed has been fixed in the cam(4) subsystem.
  • OpenPAM has been updated to the Ourouparia (20140912) release.
  • New sysctls have been added to vt(4) to enable or disable potentially dangerous key combinations (such as reboot, halt, and break to debugger).
  • The mkimg(1) utility has been updated to allow creating empty partition entries.
  • The GEOM_ELI class will now cache passphrases for disk decryption, which allows the system to boot after the first passphrase entry if the remaining disks on the system use the same passphrase.
  • Support for controlling mfi(4) controller properties has been added to mfiutil(8).
  • The /usr/lib32/compat shared library directory has been added to the default ld-elf32.so.1 path.
  • Use of "no" for a Norwegian keymap file is now permitted in rc.conf(5).
  • Several bug fixes to autofs(5) have been implemented.
Pre-installed virtual machine images for 10.1-BETA3 are also available for amd64 and i386 architectures.  The images are located here.

The disk images are available in QCOW2, VHD, VMDK, and raw disk image formats.  The image download size is approximately 135 MB, which decompress to a 20GB sparse image.

The partition layout is:
  • 512k - freebsd-boot GPT partition type (bootfs GPT label)
  • 1GB  - freebsd-swap GPT partition type (swapfs GPT label)
  • ~17GB - freebsd-ufs GPT partition type (rootfs GPT label)
To install packages from the dvd1.iso installer, create and mount the /dist directory:

# mkdir -p /dist
# mount -t cd9660 /dev/cd0 /dist

Next, install pkg(8) from the DVD:
 

# env REPOS_DIR=/dist/packages/repos pkg bootstrap

At this point, pkg-add(8) can be used to install additional packages from the DVD.  Please note, the REPOS_DIR environment variable should be used each time using the DVD as the package repository, otherwise conflicts with packages from the upstream mirrors may occur when they are fetched.  For example, to install Gnome and Xorg, run:
 

# env REPOS_DIR=/dist/packages/repos pkg install \
  xorg-server xorg gnome2 [...]

The freebsd-update(8) utility supports binary upgrades of amd64 and i386 systems running earlier FreeBSD releases.  Systems running earlier
FreeBSD releases can upgrade as follows:

# freebsd-update upgrade -r 10.1-BETA3

During this process, freebsd-update(8) may ask the user to help by merging some configuration files or by confirming that the automatically
performed merging was done correctly.

# freebsd-update install

The system must be rebooted with the newly installed kernel before continuing.


# shutdown -r now

After rebooting, freebsd-update needs to be run again to install the new userland components:


# freebsd-update install
It is recommended to rebuild and install all applications if possible, especially if upgrading from an earlier FreeBSD release, for example,
FreeBSD 8.x.  Alternatively, the user can install misc/compat9x and other compatibility libraries, afterwards the system must be rebooted
into the new userland:

# shutdown -r now

Finally, after rebooting, freebsd-update needs to be run again to remove stale files:

# freebsd-update install

Love FreeBSD?  Support this and future releases with a donation to the FreeBSD Foundation!

Sunday, September 21, 2014

FreeBSD 10.1-BETA2 Now Available

The second BETA build of the 10.1-RELEASE release cycle is now available on the FTP servers for the amd64, armv6, i386, ia64, powerpc, powerpc64 and sparc64 architectures.

The image checksums follow are included in the original announcement email.

Installer images and memory stick images are available here.

If you notice problems you can report them through the Bugzilla PR system or on the -stable mailing list.

If you would like to use SVN to do a source based update of an existing system, use the "stable/10" branch.

A list of changes since 10.0-RELEASE are available on the stable/10 release notes page.

Changes between 10.1-BETA1 and 10.1-BETA2 include:

  • UEFI-capable memory stick images and CDROM/DVDROM images are now build by default for the 10.1-RELEASE cycle.
  • The gssapi_krb5 library is now included in the gssapi(3) build.
  • The default motd(5) text has been changed to clarify the included information and including references to additional resources.
  • A potential crash in ctld(8) has been fixed when a getaddrinfo(3) call fails.
  • Fix Denial of Service in TCP packet processing.  [SA-14:19.tcp]
  • Support for Promise TX8660 8-port 3Gbps HBA has been added.
  • A crash in clang(1) triggered by debuginfo has been fixed.
  • The kern.features sysctl(8) will now report if SCTP is available in the running kernel.
  • Parsing IPv6 nameserver lines in unbound(8) has been fixed.
  • A crash in pam(3) has been fixed if neither PAM_RHOST or PAM_TTY are set.
  • Several bug fixes and improvements to the vt(4) driver have been merged from FreeBSD-Current.
  • The bsdinstall(8) screen prompting if the user would like to use a chroot(8) shell within the newly-installed system for further configuration now defaults to 'No.'
  • Several optimizations to the math(3) library have been merged, including new implementations for C99 functions expl(), coshl(), sinhl(), tanhl(), erfl() and erfcl().
Pre-installed virtual machine images for 10.1-BETA2 are also available for amd64 and i386 architectures.  The images are located here.

The disk images are available in QCOW2, VHD, VMDK, and raw disk image formats.  The image download size is approximately 135 MB, which decompress to a 20GB sparse image.

The partition layout is:
  • 512k - freebsd-boot GPT partition type (bootfs GPT label)
  • 1GB  - freebsd-swap GPT partition type (swapfs GPT label)
  • ~17GB - freebsd-ufs GPT partition type (rootfs GPT label)
To install packages from the dvd1.iso installer, create and mount the /dist directory:

# mkdir -p /dist
# mount -t cd9660 /dev/cd0 /dist

Next, install pkg(8) from the DVD:
 

# env REPOS_DIR=/dist/packages/repos pkg add \
  /dist/packages/freebsd:10:*:*/All/pkg-*.txz

At this point, pkg-add(8) can be used to install additional packages from the DVD.  Please note, the REPOS_DIR environment variable should be used each time using the DVD as the package repository, otherwise conflicts with packages from the upstream mirrors may occur when they are fetched.  For example, to install the Subversion, Gnome, and Xorg, run:
 

# env REPOS_DIR=/dist/packages/repos pkg install \
  xorg-server xorg gnome2 [...]

The freebsd-update(8) utility supports binary upgrades of amd64 and i386 systems running earlier FreeBSD releases.  Systems running earlier
FreeBSD releases can upgrade as follows:

# freebsd-update upgrade -r 10.1-BETA2

During this process, freebsd-update(8) may ask the user to help by merging some configuration files or by confirming that the automatically
performed merging was done correctly.

# freebsd-update install

The system must be rebooted with the newly installed kernel before continuing.


# shutdown -r now

After rebooting, freebsd-update needs to be run again to install the new userland components:


# freebsd-update install
It is recommended to rebuild and install all applications if possible, especially if upgrading from an earlier FreeBSD release, for example,
FreeBSD 8.x.  Alternatively, the user can install misc/compat9x and other compatibility libraries, afterwards the system must be rebooted
into the new userland:

# shutdown -r now

Finally, after rebooting, freebsd-update needs to be run again to remove stale files:

# freebsd-update install

Love FreeBSD?  Support this and future releases with a donation to the FreeBSD Foundation!